400 YEARS OF CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: Theme of 30th Anniversary Poetry Celebration

EBONY QUEEN OF CALIFORNIA

Califia, the Ebony Queen that Spanish Conquistador, Hernán Cortés, named the Spanish territory after, now known as California, which translates to, “The land whete Black women live.” Continue reading

The Prisoner Press and the Power to Inspire

In the winter of 2016, California prisoner, Donald “C-Note” Hooker, received local and national press (People), for his participation in the play he starred and co-wrote, Redemption In Our State of Blues. In the spring of 2016, he participated in … Continue reading

30-Days After Release, Prisoner Holds Fundraiser

Six years in the federal prison system and 18 years in the most notoriously violent prisons in the California prison system, this August saw the release of Min. King, William E. Brown a k a Pyeface. For those who do … Continue reading

Imprisoned Poet Heard CALL to End Mass Incarceration

University of California, Los Angeles, UCLA’s, CALL, Connecting Art and Law for Liberation, gave voice to incarcerated poets Continue reading

"Black Migration"

“Black Migration”, Theme of Poetry Celebration

EVENT: 29th Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry
THEME: Black Migration
DATE: February 2nd, 2019
TIME: 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.
LOCATION: Oakland Public Library, West Oakland Branch, Multi-Purpose Room
1801 Adeline Street, Oakland, CA 94607
(510) 238-7352
CONTACT: Oakland Public Library, West Oakland Branch (510) 238-7352; or
Wanda Sabir (510) 255-5579, info@wandaspicks.com Continue reading

“No More Massacres,” How Solutions to America’s Gun Violence Can Be Found In It’s Prisons

No More Massacres is a collaborative work of art, between imprisoned poet, Darryl Burnside, and the world’s most prolific prisoner-artist, Donald “C-Note” Hooker [1]. Imprisoned for life at 16, Burnside had been greatly affected watching year after year, teens and … Continue reading

WOULD ARETHA HAVE RENDERED, THIS IMPRISONED, BLACK POET’S RENDITION, OF “MY COUNTRY TIS OF THEE”?

In 2017, at the annual Congressional Black Caucus, Texas congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee stated, “Mass incarceration is the Civil Rights of our time.” Would 20th century civil rights activists Aretha Franklin had lent her voice to the 21st century version of “My Country Tis of Thee,” whose opening stanza is “My Country, is Still not Free”? Continue reading